Haruki Murakami leaves legacy with library at Alma Mater Waseda Univ.

0

The Haruki Murakami Library will open at the Japanese author’s Alma Mater Waseda University in Tokyo on Friday to house his personal archive, including previously donated handwritten manuscripts.

In a recent interview with Kyodo News prior to the opening of the library officially known as The Waseda International House of Literature, Murakami spoke about how he envisions the distribution of his works.

The Waseda International House of Literature, or The Haruki Murakami Library, will be shown to the media on September 22, 2021 on the Tokyo University campus prior to the facility opening on October 1. The library houses an archive of materials donated by the novelist, including his works. (Kyodo) == Kyodo

“If you just put things there, people only come once and never again. I wanted to make it a livelier place and the ideas just came from that, ”said Murakami, 72.

The five-story library with basement was designed by the 67-year-old Japanese architect Kengo Kuma. Facilities include research rooms such as the library, areas for interaction and a studio equipped with sound technology.

“Whatâ € ™ s strength is that it is in the middle of the city and that it is open (to the public). I want to do something that will also attract the outside world,” said Murakami.

In the hope that the library will become a center for international exchange in the field of Japanese literature research, he will also provide reading hours for authors and radio recordings there.

(From L) Waseda University President Aiji Tanaka, writer Haruki Murakami, CEO of Fast Retailing Co. Tadashi Yanai and architect Kengo Kuma are in Tokyo after a press conference on September 22, 2021 about the opening of The Waseda International Pictured on Oct. 1, House of Literature or The Haruki Murakami Library, which houses an archive of materials donated by Murakami, including his works. Kuma designed the library on the university campus with renovation expenses donated by Yanai. (Kyodo) == Kyodo

“I have no children, so I wanted to prevent my resources and manuscripts from being lost after my death,” said Murakami, explaining his donation.

When Murakami took the stage in April to congratulate aspiring art students at Waseda University, he compared the existence of novelists to a “torch” and expressed the hope that the flame would be passed on for generations to come.

“I learned how to write novels from my bosses, and I think there are a few people who will continue what I wrote. Perhaps because I don’t have children, I have a stronger sense of public inheritance or inheritance in a larger, non-personal sense, “he said.

Murakami believes that one’s “way of life” can also be inherited. In the past, literary figures have been associated with “drunkenness, affairs, drinking and missing deadlines,” but Murakami enjoys jogging and has run entire marathons.

Writer Haruki Murakami is pictured after attending a press conference in Tokyo on September 22, 2021 about the opening of the Waseda International House of Literature or the Haruki Murakami Library on October 1. The library on the university campus houses an archive of materials donated by the novelist, including his works. (Kyodo) == Kyodo

“At first people said to me: ‘If you live so healthily, you can’t write,'” he says with a laugh. But he added that by doing this he was able to show the next generation a possibility.

“The mainstream of the literary world went downhill after Mr. Kenji Nakagami passed away, and now it has no pillars. I think there is a need for Japanese writers to take some kind of responsibility, and I think there are things that I do too can do, “he said.

When Murakami went to university in 1968, the student movement was at its height. Although he did not belong to any particular sect, as he did not like to be part of a group, the idea of ​​”overcoming one-sided learning and establishing spontaneous learning” resonated and he took part in demonstrations.

“I think the idealism we had is important. Even if a lot of it was kind of unrealistic, it is important to have ideals. But nowadays it has become difficult for young people to have ideals,” said Murakami.

Against this background, Murakami sees potential in the voluntary and non-profit engagement of students. “I want to create a place with such potential within the university and I hope that students will take up such activities after I leave,” he said.

The library opens amid the novel coronavirus pandemic. Murakami, who has responded to disasters like the Great Hanshin Earthquake and the Sarin gas attack on the Tokyo subway, said: “I have reacted my way at every turning point. I think creating some kind of community in the coronavirus era “has a meaning in itself.”

The Waseda International House of Literature, or The Haruki Murakami Library, will be shown to the media on September 22, 2021 on the Tokyo University campus prior to the facility opening on October 1. The library houses an archive of materials donated by the novelist, including his works. (Kyodo) == Kyodo


Source link

Share.

Leave A Reply