The moment a Japanese tanker docks in a port with a 12-meter-long dead fin whale stuck to the bow

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How did you not notice? The moment a Japanese tanker docks in a port with a 12-meter-long dead fin whale stuck to the bow

  • Shocking images show the huge creature that spread across the ship on Tuesday
  • The tanker crew claims they did not notice the whale was hit during its voyage
  • Experts say the species is likely a fin whale found around the world
  • Witnesses at Mizushima Port in Kurashiki said they had never seen anything like it
  • The Coast Guard said measures to prevent such an incident were being reviewed
  • It is unclear whether the company that owns the tanker is being investigated










The carcass of a 32-foot fin whale was found on the bow of a Japanese tanker entering port.

Shocking images show the giant creature that spread across the ship in Mizushima port in Kurashiki city on Tuesday.

The coast guard was called to the port after locals spotted the whale.

Local news site Yomiuri reported that the tanker sailed across the Pacific Ocean en route to Mizushima port and the crew claimed they had no idea they’d met a whale.

“I’ve been fishing here for decades, but it’s the first time I’ve seen a whale,” a fisherman who watched the tanker entering the port told local media.

“I’ve lived for more than eighty years, but it’s my first time [seeing a whale]“Said another witness.

Shocking images show the giant whale that spread over the ship in Mizushima port in Kurashiki city on Tuesday

The coast guard was called to the port after locals saw the dead whale

The coast guard was called to the port after locals saw the dead whale

Local news site Yomiuri reported that the tanker sailed across the Pacific Ocean en route to Mizushima port and the crew claimed they had no idea they had met a whale

Local news site Yomiuri reported that the tanker sailed across the Pacific Ocean en route to Mizushima port and the crew claimed they had no idea they had met a whale

A spokesman for the Mizushima Coast Guard said they had never seen anything like it and measures to prevent such an incident were being examined.

The species of the whale has yet to be confirmed, but the Institute for Cetacean Research told Yomiuri that it appeared to be a fin whale.

Riki Tamura, director of the Department of Resources and Biology at the Institute for Whale Research, told Japanese media that the whale appears to be a member of the Rorqual family, which includes fin whales.

The fin whale, also known as the fin whale, is classified as an endangered species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

It is the second longest species of whale on earth after the blue whale, reaching a length of 27.3 meters (89.6 feet) and a weight of 74 tons.

It is found in all of the world’s major oceans and in waters that range from polar to tropical waters.

No information has been released as to whether the company that owns the tanker or the crew is under investigation.  The company was not named

No information has been released as to whether the company that owns the tanker or the crew is under investigation. The company was not named

The species of the whale has yet to be confirmed, but the Institute for Cetacean Research told Yomiuri that it appears to be a fin whale

The species of the whale has yet to be confirmed, but the Institute for Cetacean Research told Yomiuri that it appears to be a fin whale

Like all whales, the fin whale was born in the 20th century.

Today, around 100,000 to 119,000 wild fin whales live in the wild.

Another Japanese news site suggested that the whale might be a humpback whale because of its “chin pattern”

No information has been released as to whether the company that owns the tanker or the crew is under investigation. The company was not named.


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